The Home Affairs Select Committee from the UK Government is calling organizations for evidence on the channel crossings, migration, and asylum seeking routes through the EU.

Written evidence is invited on the issues set out below – but please note that submissions do not need to address all of these issues:

  • Reasons behind the increase in irregular or illegal channel crossings, including economic and political drivers
  • Actions taken by French and UK government personnel to reduce the risk to life for migrants crossing the English Channel in small boats
  • The legal position of migrants crossing the English Channel and the obligations of UK and French authorities and other parties to ensure their safety under UK and International (Maritime) Law
  • Actions taken by the French and UK governments to identify, apprehend and prosecute criminals involved in the traffic of migrants across the English Channel and determine the financial gains being made from human trafficking
  • Future arrangements for safe, legal routes for family reunion and claiming asylum in the UK, and the effectiveness of current Government initiatives to re-unite families
  • Conditions in migrant camps in France and other states such as Italy and Greece
  • The care provided for unaccompanied children arriving in the UK.

Click here for further information and to submit written evidence.

Submissions should be received by 12 noon on Monday 14 September.

Stellenbosch University – The Unit for Religion and Development Research

The URDR, in partnership with Ekklesia, is hosting a series of webinars for local faith leaders entitled ‘Healthy Households’. Each webinar will deal with a different topic relevant to the challenges that development practitioners and religious leaders are facing during the COVID 19 pandemic. They all focus on the South African context.

“Child Protection, Faith Communities and COVID-19” was the third webinar in the series held on Wednesday 5th August 2020 at 1-2.30pm SAST. Expert speakers included the newly appointed Western Cape Commissioner for Children  –  Ms Christina Nomdo, the director of community based organisation Arise Family SA  – Danielle Moosajie, and the URDR’s academic expert on Ending Violence against Children and Faith – Dr Selina Palm.  PDFs of their individual presentation slides are also available by clicking on their above names.

Click here for more URDR news and events

Date/Time
Date(s) - 21/08/2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Categories


The G20 is a leading multilateral forum that addresses the world’s most critical issues. Since 2014, an interfaith forum has brought together different networks focused on global agendas, working with the annual G20 host country’s government and its religious communities. The G20 Interfaith Association, formally established in 2019, provides overall coordination through a diverse advisory network and successive partnerships shaped by each year’s event. The forum’s goal is to explore leading global agendas from the vantage point of religious communities and to provide robust guidance and recommendations to the G20 leaders at their annual summit. The host government agenda, within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), is the focus for discussions. However, prominent world events reshape agendas, and in 2020 the COVID-19 crisis permeates every issue under consideration by G20 governments and by religious networks.

G20 Interfaith Forums are preceded by preparatory events and discussions, often focused on specific world regions. This North America regional event of the G20 Interfaith Forum will focus on three primary topics: 1) refugees and forced migration; 2) religious responses to COVID-19; and 3) anti-racism and religious responsibilities. Leaders from religious communities and networks focused on global policies will frame each topic and highlight relevant actions the G20 leaders and religious communities should consider at the G20 Interfaith Forum in October.

Please RSVP  here.

Friday, August 21 Schedule

12:00 p.m.–12.30 p.m. | Overall Reflections and Lessons
Mohammed Abu-Nimer, KAICIID
Cole Durham, Brigham Young University

12:30 p.m. –12:55 p.m. | Topic-specific Reflections and Lessons
Ganoune Diop, Seventh-day Adventist Church
Katherine Marshall, Georgetown University
Olivia Wilkinson, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities

12:55 p.m.–1:00 p.m. | Conclusion
Katherine Marshall, Georgetown University

View the Monday August 17 schedule here.

View the Participants here.

This event is hosted by Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs and the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD). The co-organizers of the 2020 G20 Interfaith Forum are the G20 Interfaith Forum Association, the International Dialogue Centre (KAICIID), the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), and the National Committee for Interfaith and Intercultural Dialogue in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (NCIID).

Date/Time
Date(s) - 17/08/2020
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Categories


The G20 is a leading multilateral forum that addresses the world’s most critical issues. Since 2014, an interfaith forum has brought together different networks focused on global agendas, working with the annual G20 host country’s government and its religious communities. The G20 Interfaith Association, formally established in 2019, provides overall coordination through a diverse advisory network and successive partnerships shaped by each year’s event. The forum’s goal is to explore leading global agendas from the vantage point of religious communities and to provide robust guidance and recommendations to the G20 leaders at their annual summit. The host government agenda, within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), is the focus for discussions. However, prominent world events reshape agendas, and in 2020 the COVID-19 crisis permeates every issue under consideration by G20 governments and by religious networks.

G20 Interfaith Forums are preceded by preparatory events and discussions, often focused on specific world regions. This North America regional event of the G20 Interfaith Forum will focus on three primary topics: 1) refugees and forced migration; 2) religious responses to COVID-19; and 3) anti-racism and religious responsibilities. Leaders from religious communities and networks focused on global policies will frame each topic and highlight relevant actions the G20 leaders and religious communities should consider at the G20 Interfaith Forum in October.

Please RSVP  here.

Monday, August 17 Schedule

12:00 p.m.–12:10 p.m. | Welcome, Expectations, Introductions
Faisal bin Muaammar, KAICIID
Shaun Casey, Georgetown University
Cole Durham, Brigham Young University

12:10 p.m.–12:25 p.m. | Keynote Address
Roméo Dallaire, Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative

12:25 p.m.–12:45 p.m. | Conversation on Refugees and Forced Migration
Aden Batar, Catholic Community Services
Rev. David Hollenbach, S.J., Georgetown University

12:45 p.m.–1:05 p.m. | Conversation on Religious Responses to COVID-19
Ruth Messinger, American Jewish World Service
Olivia Wilkinson, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities

1:05 p.m.–1:25 p.m. | Conversation on Anti-Racism and Religious Responsibilities
Ganoune Diop, Seventh-day Adventist Church
Audrey Kitagawa, Parliament of the World’s Religions

1:25 p.m.–1:30 p.m. | Wrap-up
Katherine Marshall, Georgetown University

View the Friday August 21 schedule here.

View the Participants here.

This event is hosted by Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs and the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD). The co-organizers of the 2020 G20 Interfaith Forum are the G20 Interfaith Forum Association, the International Dialogue Centre (KAICIID), the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), and the National Committee for Interfaith and Intercultural Dialogue in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (NCIID).

Date/Time
Date(s) - 24/08/2020
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Categories


Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs and JLI

A joint JLI – WFDD – Berkley Center Initiative on COVID-19

Each country faces different challenges as they confront the double crisis of COVID-19 infection and related economic and social shocks. The COVID-19 emergency is also disrupting the ongoing strategies and programs of leading international faith-inspired organizations. Many are responding directly to varying dimensions of the COVID-19 emergency while at the same time maintaining their focus on critical development priorities. Sri Lanka stands out among countries for its progress on human development, but also, less positively, for bitter conflicts that have included religious dimensions. It also has one of the most respected faith-inspired movements: Sarvodaya, a leader in community-driven development that has built on Buddhist principles. Sarvodaya is deeply involved in Sri Lanka’s challenges, listening to and supporting communities responding to natural disasters, ethnic conflicts, and now to the COVID-19 emergency.

Dr. Vinya Ariyaratne, president of Sarvodaya and a medical doctor by training, will use the COVID-19 emergency to frame his reflection on Sri Lanka’s experience. Berkley Center Senior Fellow Katherine Marshall will engage with Ariyaratne, focusing on four questions: How have COVID-19 challenges affected daily life and livelihoods in Sri Lanka, as well as health services? What have been distinctive effects on women, including female-headed households and returning migrant workers? How has Sarvodaya related to government entities and WHO during the crisis, and has this posed specific challenges or benefits? Finally, how has this emergency affected peacebuilding in the country and the roles of peacebuilders? The discussion will build upon these questions to explore the many facets of Sri Lanka’s current situation.

Please RSVP here.

The Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 9:00 a.m. EDT on August 24 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to this page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted.

Read more about the joint JLI-WFDD-Berkley Center COVID-19 and Faith Initiative here

Date/Time
Date(s) - 22/09/2020 - 24/09/2020
9:30 am - 12:30 pm

Categories


Please Save the Date to the HIV Interfaith Conference, “Resilience & Renewal: faith in the HIV response”, that will take place virtually on 22-23-24 September 2020.

Resilience & Renewal will provide a space for sharing, capacity building and advocacy among people of faith involved in HIV and AIDS. It will be an opportunity to celebrate and get inspired by the many resilient people engaged in the HIV response; and an occasion to recommit faith leaders and communities in the comprehensive response to HIV.

Resilience and Renewal will create a space for dialogue and an opportunity to identify joint actions to address some of the challenges and emerging issues to the achievements of the 2020 and 2030 HIV-related targets.

The event is organized by several faith groups’ representatives around the world and people living with HIV through the support of the UNAIDS-PEPFAR Faith Initiative.

Venue: Virtual Platform

Dates: 22-23-24 September 2020

Languages: English & French

Registration and Participation are free of charge.

Please register at: https://forms.gle/CuuQC7pqcyBHZb5F9

View the Event Flyer here

View the detailed programme here

Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI), UNICEF and Religions for Peace (RfP), has released a series of guidance documents to advise religious leaders and faith communities on how to address challenges brought about by COVID-19.  

“UNICEF has a long history of working with faith-based organizations and faith leaders to advance the cause of children and families,” said Dr. Kerida McDonald, UNICEF Senior Advisor for Communication for Development. “With the pandemic, this partnership has become even more critical. COVID-19 is a child rights crisis and we all need to work together to reimagine a better and safer world for every child.”

The pandemic has impacted mass gatherings associated with religious celebrations and worship as well as practices around burials, communion, kissing of religious objects and other common religious rituals, which can pose significant public health risks.

The guidance seeks to provide concrete direction for multi-religious action, building on existing local efforts and bringing together scientific and technical information alongside relevant religious teachings.

Three sets of guidance have been released so far:

  • Adapting How We Gather Together, Pray and Practise Rituals: The guide puts forward specific guidelines for how religious leaders can interact, congregate, worship and perform religious rites, including death and mourning rituals while continuing to ensure the safety and well-being of their communities
  • Communicating to End Misinformation, Discrimination and to Instil Hope: The document outlines some of key contributing factors and negative effects of misinformation, rumours, fear, hopelessness, stigma, and discrimination and guides religious leaders on how they can help tackle these challenges.
  • Helping Those Who Are At Risk: People such as the elderly, homeless, migrants, people with disabilities, pregnant women, and children are at greater risk of complications and death due to COVID-19 and may be unable to practice the recommended preventive behaviours. The guide outlines the specific needs of these groups and suggestions for providing assistance and encouraging values of solidarity, community and hope.

“As countries move towards lifting lockdowns, the pandemic poses crippling secondary effects especially for households hardest hit by loss of income and resulting strains,” said Professor Azza Karam, Secretary General of RfP. “The Guides provide faith leaders with advice on helping communities to deal with some of these effects.”

The guidance documents have been designed for local adaptation and use by religious leaders, faith communities, and faith-based organisations at national and community levels. Their release is part of the Multi-Religious Faith-in-Action COVID-19 Initiative launched in April 2020 to raise awareness of the impacts of this pandemic, including on the world’s youngest citizens.

Upcoming guidance documents will focus on preventing violence against women and children, promoting child and youth participation, and supporting the recovery of social services.

 

###

Note to the editors

For additional information, download the guides here or https://www.faith4positivechange.org/ 

About UNICEF

UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. More than 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, to build a better world for everyone. For more information about UNICEF and its work for children, visit www.unicef.org.

 

About Multi-Religious Faith-in-Action COVID-19 Initiative

The joint initiative by UNICEF, JLI and RfP reflects the unique and critical roles played by religious leaders and actor, in influencing values, attitudes, behaviours and actions that affect the development and wellbeing of the world’s children. The Initiative will be coordinated by the global partnership on Faith and Positive Change for Children, Families and Communities, which involves Religions for Peace’s Interreligious Councils, including senior leaders of the world’s religious and spiritual traditions – Bahai, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Islamic, Jain, Jewish, Sikh, Zoroastrian and Indigenous spirituality. It also includes interfaith youth and women’s networks, in collaboration with the Joint Learning Initiative of Local Faith Communities (JLI) with its membership of International Faith-Based organizations, and calls upon all communities across the world, together with governments, UN entities, and broad civil society organisations to raise awareness of the impacts of this pandemic on the world’s youngest citizens.

The Global Multi-religious Faith In Action Initiative was formalized through a global statement and call to action by UNICEF’s Executive Director Henrietta Fore and the 13 senior religious leaders of Religions for Peace.

About FPCC

The Faith and Positive Change For Children, Families and Communities initiative aims to strengthen UNICEF’s partnership with Faith-Based Organizations in support of results for children globally.

FPCC is a result of close collaboration between UNICEF’s Communication for Development Section, Civil Society Partnerships section of the Division of Communication, along with main partner organizations.

In 2014 the UNICEF-Religions for Peace (RfP) initiated a comprehensive review of UNICEF’s global engagement with faith leaders, organizations. Areas of interest included the range and types of religious groups, categories of support and thematic focus areas of partnerships that UNICEF had formed during the previous five years.

The investigation of UNICEF programming in 149 countries, territories and areas revealed that Communication for Development (C4D)- related activities (sensitization, social mobilization and advocacy) represented 32%, 20% and 17% categories of support respectively. Altogether, C4D- related activities accounted for two-thirds of country level FBO-related activities. The mapping also identified religious leaders and institutions as the partners of preference for Country Offices. Communication for Development (C4D)- related activities.

C4D has since continued such documentation and research. In 2017 C4DHQ, along with the UNIEF Child Protection Section, worked with the African Union to produce an introductory guide on behaviour change. Individual country offices have also collaborated extensively, producing country-level documentation.

One particular project on the role of FBOs on addressing harmful social norms was used as part of training workshop material for a continent- workshop for religious leaders across Africa in combatting Child Marriage. Through such collaboration FBOs have received greater technical guidance on how to facilitate dialogue in support of social and behaviour change related to the priority areas of UNICEF’s work.

 

About RfP

Religions for Peace (RfP) builds on a 50-year legacy of multi-religious engagement nuanced, informed and challenged by diverse and complex contexts at community, national, regional and global levels. Since its inception in 1970, RfP’s affiliated Interreligious Councils (IRCs)and their Women of Faith Networks and Inter-faith Youth Networks, have engaged in a wide range of social, political, economic and humanitarian issues. As such, RfP’s multi-religious vision and engagement are built on shared values derived from both religious tenets and faith-inspired praxis.

RfP is the only international multi-religious organisation with affiliated and legally registered multi-religious leadership platforms around the world. Membership within these 90 national and 6 regional IRCs is built on the principle of religious representatively, reflecting the fabric of religious demography on those levels. It is through these IRCs, built and strengthened over five decades of committed efforts and investment, that RfP advances comprehensive, holistic and sustainable peace.. For RfP, peace has always been more than the absence or war or violence. Indeed, the advancement of human dignity and shared well-being, in harmony with the earth, with and through representative religious institutions and faith leadership, is at the heart of RfP’s understanding and vision of peace.

To learn more, visit rfp.org

 

About JLI

Founded in 2012, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) Communities (JLI is an international collaboration on evidence for faith groups’ role and contributions to local community health and wellbeing and ending poverty. JLI works through Learning Hubs and Knowledge partnerships (such as with the Faith and Positive Change for Children Initiative ) providing an open access knowledge platform to equip policymakers and practitioners with the information they need to make evidence based decisions about whether and how to scale up engagement with local and global faith actors . JLI also serves as liaison with international and local FBOs. More than 700 stakeholders globally are members of Learning Hubs coming from policy, practitioner and academic sectors.

Find out more at jliflc.com

 

View the press release on the UNICEF website

The Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) is an international collaboration and knowledge platform on evidence for faith groups’ activities and contributions to local development and humanitarian challenges.

JLI brings together international humanitarian and development organizations, UN agencies, academic institutions and FBOs and religious bodies for joint learning and collaboration. Together, these groups generate and communicate robust evidence to policy makers and practitioners in order to strengthen partnerships between faith groups and the humanitarian and development communities.

JLI is recruiting a learning and communications consultant with experience in international development, humanitarian or relevant subject area, and an interest in the role of faith and religion.

  1. 50% of this work will be informed by the Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC) Hub work to date and communications priorities as identified by the Hub. Working closely with JLI’s Senior Programs and Knowledge Manager, the consultant will develop hub communications content.

Activities:

  • Develop communications materials to support key themes as identified from EVAC Hub leadership including three one-pagers and revise online evidence guide to support three online events.
  • Produce and share supporting materials may also include blog posts, podcasts and newspaper articles. (August – Sept)

50% of this work will be focused on improving overall JLI communications strategy and designing a comprehensive CRM platform representing specific target groups/audiences.  The communications strategy will be informed by the work done to date within the EVAC hub, as above deliverables will inform replication by other hubs.

Activities:

  • Develop weekly content for JLI social media platforms. Track and improve analytics and indicators to achieve communications goals and report to JLI staff. (August- Dec)
  • Ensure website content communicates JLI vision and programs accurately.
  • Revise and improve Hub webpages. (August- Dec)
  • Support CRM Platform development for network growth and analysis across audiences (August- Dec)

Skill set and experience required

  • Bachelor’s degree in Communications and understanding of International Development, and Humanitarian issues; familiarity with religion is a plus.
  • Excellent writing and communications skills, especially from technical and academic texts to documents for more policymakers and practitioners.
  • Skilled in social media, including Mail Chimp, Google Analytics and WordPress.
  • Experience with design software such as Canva, able to produce branded publications and newsletters
  • Experience with selecting, creating and managing CRM software,
  • Comfortable with fast paced, interactive work style in a virtual context

Compensation will be based on experience, estimated 60-75 hours per month

Reports to: JLI Sr Programs and Knowledge Manager

Please send a resume, a relevant writing sample and letter of interest, describing how your experience and qualifications relate to these responsibilities to: [email protected]

Date/Time
Date(s) - 08/07/2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Categories


Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs and JLI

A joint JLI – WFDD – Berkley Center Initiative on COVID-19

Hunger is a widespread and urgent reality in places where COVID-19 lockdowns and economic downturns affect the many whose livelihoods are precarious. Religious communities and organizations have long focused on food security, from agricultural production (especially by smallholders) to distribution and nutrition. They also serve those who are hungry with food banks and other programs. This webinar set the immediate crisis against the backdrop of continuing efforts, including those supported by faith institutions, to assure food security and to develop smallholder agriculture. Has the agenda shifted with the COVID crisis, and if so, how? What are the major gaps that have contributed to the COVID-19 emergency in relation to food security? What are priority actions moving forward? What can be said about lessons from religious engagement on this topic during the COVID-19 emergency?

This event featured Rev. Nicta Lubaale, whose career has focused on action programs and reforms that enable smallholder farmers to achieve what has long been recognized as their potential for self-reliance and robust farming systems. Asma Lateef, director of Bread for the World Institute, and Lister Nyang’anyi, director of development services for the Anglican Diocese of Central Tanganyika, Dodoma, Tanzania, joined Rev. Lubaale in a discussion moderated by Berkley Center Senior Fellow Katherine Marshall.

View Event on Berkley Website

Click here to read the event summary

Read more about the joint JLI-WFDD-Berkley Center COVID-19 and Faith Initiative here

On July 9, 2020, JLI held a webinar where Fabian Winger, University of Zurich, presented on his article, “More than an intensive care phenomenon”: Religious communities and the WHO Guidelines for Ebola and Covid-19. Olivia Wilkonson, JLI’s Director of Research responded followed by questions from the participants.

Click here to read the article.

Click here to register and view the list of upcoming webinars

Read the WHO Guidelines on COVID: Practical considerations and recommendations for religious leaders and faith-based communities in the context of COVID-19