JLI Leadership Meeting

October 24, 25 London

Salvation Army

The October 25 & 25 meetings of the JLI included 34 board, advisory group and learning hub co-chairs. The two-day meeting objectives were to share the current state of JLI hub evidence, examine JLI’s role considering the external environment and determine JLI’s next steps. Matthew Frost, JLI Board Co-chair for the past few years stepped down at the meeting. Matthew will continue as a general board member. Thanks to Matthew for all the wisdom and gifts shared during your time leading the JLI! With a new board co-chair elected unanimously –Jonathan Duffy, President, ADRA International, JLI will be focusing on how to implement goals identified at the board meeting.

Goals

  1. embed local and national voices into the JLI especially learning hubs
  2. proactive research and ensuring quality
  3. sharpen advocacy and influence

More outcomes from the board meeting to come

Localizing Response to Humanitarian Need: The Role of Religious and Faith-Based Organizations

October 16-19, 2017

Colombo, Sri Lanka

Faith leaders, aid agencies around the world join forum on localizing humanitarian response

JLI cohosted the Localizing Response to Humanitarian Need Forum with over 140 participants representing multiple local and global faith networks, faith-based organizations, aid agencies, policy makers, and government representatives have participated in a forum to strengthen partnership and networks in localizing humanitarian responseFocus on documentation of methods and mechanisms of engagement of local faith networks.

Working Areas:

  • Children & Health
  • Conflict & Peacemaking
  • Disaster response
  • Disaster risk reduction and resilience
  • Refugees & Forced Migration
  • Gender-based Violence

BRIEF SUMMARY REPORT

 

 

On October 20, the new JLI Anti-Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Hub launched at the Anglican Alliance. Gathering a group of core members, the hub discussed the terms of reference and key questions the hub would address. The group focused on areas related to prevention, protection, prosecution, policy, partnerships and participation.

The purpose of this Hub is to be a horizontal learning community and global resource that links academics, policy makers and practitioners working on issues of faith, faith leaders and religious communities to combat human trafficking and modern slavery. The goals are to:

  • Identify and examine what we know about human trafficking, with respect to the role of faith based actors and religious and cultural values, and the reliability of this research. Work out how we can better communicate existing research.
  • Identify gaps in knowledge which can be addressed through further research and learning (with an emphasis on practical application afterwards).
  • Arrive at practical actionable recommendations in these areas (for programmes and policy) that JLI members would be encouraged to implement in their own organisations, use to potentially influence the practice of others, and which could increase effective partnerships/collaboration between members of the Hub (secular and faith based) in ending human trafficking and modern slavery.

Faith and Harmful Traditional Practices

Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices

Tearfund cordially invites you to join us for this multi-dimensional event to review and discuss the findings of the DFID funded, JLI SGBV Hub research exploring the role of faith in addressing Harmful Traditional Practices.

The event will be comprised of a presentation and discussion of key findings pertaining to:
  • The language of Harmful Traditional Practices
  • Safe Spaces for facilitating conversations regarding Harmful Traditional Practices
  • The interconnection between Harmful traditional Practices, Culture, Social Norms and underlying social ideologies.
The day will include space for break-out discussions to provide attendees with the opportunity to critically engage with the findings and discuss the implications and opportunities that these offer.
​Please RSVP by Thursday 26th October by emailing Natalia Lester-Bush at [email protected].

The Guidelines on the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR) Global call for proposals 2017

deadline 9 Nov 2017
Specific objectives include the following:
  • Lot 1: Supporting Human Rights Defenders in the area of land-related rights, indigenous peoples, in the context of inter alia ‘land grabbing’ and climate change.
  • Lot 2: Fighting against extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances.
  • Lot 3: Combating forced labour and modern slavery.
  • Lot 4: Promoting and supporting the rights of persons with disabilities.
  • Lot 5: Supporting freedom of religion or belief.

For more information see here

October Events

October 3:  JLI Joint Learning Webinar on Local Humanitarian Leadership with Oxfam America

October 11-12:  WCC Workshop on mapping Christian health services

October 9-13: One Accord Forum and Expo

October 11-13: Alliance for Peacebuilding’s Annual Conference: Peace Now More than Ever

October 14: Boston University Going Viral: Religion and Health

October 16-19Localising Response to Humanitarian Need

October 26: Faith and feminism working group The impact of fundamentalism and extremism on the cultural rights of women: time to take a stand

October 30: UN Strategic Learning Exchange & Skills Building Workshop: Religion, Gender and Youth Inclusion in Peace & Security

October 31: 2017 Annual International Conference on Ethnic and Religious Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding

 

November

Nov 9: Interfaith Symposium Countering Fear & Rise in Discrimination UK

Nov 10: JLI SGBV Hub Study Dissemination

Nov 12-15: PaRD annual meeting (London)

Nov 15: DFID/ UKAid conference “Current challenges in Freedom of Religion or Belief

Nov 16-18: Vatican: Addressing Global Health Inequalities

Nov 21UN Staff Strategic Learning Exchange- Engaging with Faith Organizations and communities

Nov 26: Faith-based organizations’ contribution to Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction

JLI Joint Learning Opportunity: Webinar on Local Humanitarian Leadership – hosted by the JLI Refugee Hub and Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Hub

October 3 

Local Humanitarian Leadership and Faith
Guest Presenter: Tara Gingerich – Oxfam America

Moderator: Catriona DejeanTearfund (JLI Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Learning Hub co-chair)

Local humanitarian leadership is built upon the premise that humanitarian action should be led by local humanitarian actors whenever possible, yet this research finds that secular humanitarian INGOs do not engage systematically with local faith actors in their local leadership work. Based primarily on interviews with humanitarian INGO staff, this research also found that neither secular nor faith-inspired international humanitarian organizations have a sufficient level of religious literacy to enable them to understand the religious dimensions of the contexts in which they work and to effectively navigate their engagement with local faith actors.

Webinar included the following discussion on local humanitarian leadership and religious literacy.

Response from Catriona Dejean
  • Faith-inspired vs faith- embedded organizations – for some FBOs faith is at the DNA of who and how they work, so it is beyond inspiration
  • Role of relationships: trust between local faith communities and secular organizations are critical especially during humanitarian events (ie good examples in Myanmar, Middle East)
  • It is important to not only look at the structures, processes and tools for engaging with faith communties, but also to understand what enables good and open relationships.
  • Attitudes and behaviors on engagement across faiths and non-faith groups could be explored further.
  • What makes a response effective with local faith communities? The report stated no real difference between secular and faith actors. Could it be because we have different definitions of effective? For example some faith organizations and actors are interested in holistic changes so effectiveness may be framed beyond the tangible or traditional definition of effectiveness.
From other attendees:
  • Role of faith-based organizations as intermediaries
  • There seems to be some dissonance between the responses reported in the research (from HQ) and the situation on the ground, where FBOs face a lot of pressure. There might be an openness to the recommendations stemming from the research such as designing a religious literacy toolkit, but there will need to be a true dialogue on a practitioner level and real socialization.
  • Suggestions for secular organizations seeking to discuss topics with faith-based actors for which they have different understandings. How can these conversations happen most productively? Practicality of engaging with local faith actors
    • On alignment (or not) with local faith groups and how to deal with issues – the Oxfam recommendation to develop tools to help truly assess religion/culture/historical influences on the target group in a humanitarian response is vital. That should help tease out more clearly what the actual or perceived differences are. Ultimately though, as was said, if a local faith community (or any partner of any kind) isn’t able to or doesn’t desire to ‘align’ with humanitarian principles – INGOs needs to decide whether the partnership can continue. We have to deal with our issues too of course!
    • If the whole community believes in one specific religion, it’s simple, but if it’s divided into some religious groups, it can become sensitive. The literacy should cover this aspect as well.
  • About LFAs impartiality, neutrality,& proselytising: how often does this happen vs how often do people on the international level worry about this occuring?
  • Forthcoming article called ‘“Faith can come in, but not religion.” Secularity and its effects on the disaster response to Typhoon Haiyan.’ that deals with impartiality and some of the hypocrisy.
  • See Katie Kraft’s article in the ICRC journal on impartiality and proselytization.
  • The basic idea is that religion manifests in Faith-based NGOs in different ways, such as their names, missions, activities, goals, modes of expression, membership or employment criteria, institutional origins, or the identity of populations they serve, and invisibility is their greatest asset. That is, Faith-based NGOs are most effective in private coalitions and when they do not engage in explicitly religious terms.
  • See also American Academy of Religions recent book: Religion, NGOs and the UN
  • Important to dig into ‘instrumentalism’
  • The JLI Refugee hub will be releasing it’s first scoping study on Urban Displacement, Refugees & Forced Migration and the Role of Faith Actors soon.
  • The Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Hub will have a webinar coming up in December
  • On Oct 16-19, a relevant conference co-hosted by the JLI will occur in Sri Lanka on Localizing the response to Humanitarian Need: The Role of Religious and Faith-based organizations
    see lrf2017.org

Local Humanitarian Leadership and Faith Presentation

 

JLI Collaborations- Interview with Nicta Lubaale & Lincoln Lau

After meeting at the JLI’s Religion & Sustainable Development Conference (2015), the Organization of African Instituted Churches (OAIC) and International Care Ministries (ICM) have partnered up to learn from each other on monitoring, evaluation, and learning for organizations working through local faith communities. JLI Consultant, Dr Olivia Wilkinson spoke to Rev. Nicta Lubaale (OAIC) and Dr. Lincoln Lau (ICM) to find out more about their collaboration.

 

September 18, 2017

at Moral Imperative UNGA Meeting

Location: WCC Church Center

Launch of the Ending Violence Against Children Hub

Hosted by the JLI Ending Violence Against Children Learning Hub with co-chair organizations: Arigatou International and World Vision International

The meeting introduced the JLI EVAC Hub, discussed roles of faith communities and actors in  Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC).

Panel included:

  • JLI EVAC Core Members: Gerry Dyer  representing the Global Partnership on VAC and Rabbi Diana Gerson, NY Board of Rabbis
  • Adam Taylor, Moral Imperative
  • Jean Duff, JLI Coordinator
  • JLI EVAC Hub Representatives: Christo Greyling, World Vision International and Rebeca Rios-Kohn, Arigatou International

The convening co-chairs of the JLI Learning Hub on Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC Hub) are:

  • Robyn Hagan, World Vision International, Global Advisor – Faith Partnerships for Child Protection
  • Rebeca Rios-Kohn, Arigatou International New York Office, Director
  • Carola Eyber, Queen Margaret University, Institute for Global Health and Development, Senior Lecturer

Following the launch the JLI Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC) Learning Hub met together at the Salvation Army ISJC with academics, policy experts, and practitioners to review and analyse the knowledge base regarding the multiple roles of faith and faith actors to influence or end violence against children, in line with SDG 16.2. The Ending Violence Against Children Hub is a part of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith & Local Communities Learning Hubs. For a meeting summary please join the hub here

 

SVRI Forum in Rio, September 18-21

SVRI is a space for the gathering of researchers and practitioners working in the area of SGBV. SVRI Forum 2017 will provide a platform for showcasing research and innovation in the field enabling participants to learn about new and tested interventions on how to end sexual violence, intimate partner violence and child abuse and maltreatment

September 19, 2017 

Faith and GBV Panel: at 11:30am  (venue: COPACABANA)

Chair: Veena O’Sullivan

JOINT LEARNING INITIATIVE on Faith & Local Communities (JLI) SGBV HUB

at 16:00 – 18:00 (Venue: Botafogo)

Hosted by: JLI SGBV Hub

Faith plays a powerful influence on the lives of communities including survivors. Spiritual healing or well-being is a key aspect of the overall wellbeing of survivors as expressed by them so there is a real need to explore ways in which the global community explores, understands and works with faith in SGBV. Efforts are needed to promote partnerships between faith groups and other key stakeholders including researchers to begin to explore the role of faith in SGBV prevention and response.

As a process of bridging the gap between faith groups and other key stakeholders this session seeks to highlight the following: Share and discuss findings from Tearfund research on the role of faith in prevention and response to SGBV; Present an overview of evidence for faith groups’ activity and contribution to SGBV prevention and care, based on JLI SGBV Scoping Study; Understand the faith language, expressions and the real meaning of the same; Explore the mechanisms and approaches for developing good practice standards for faith response to SGBV; Identify key learning and tools to work with faith communities, and what additional tools are needed; and Launch the JLI SGBV Learning Hub.

September 20, 2017 at 14:30 (venue: LEME)

Faith and VAW

Chair: Chi-Chi Undie

September 21, 2017 at 11:30 am (venue: COPACABANA)

Science Pitches: Faith, Harassment & Responses

Chair: Tirhani Mangani

 

For more information on the program and other presentations see here