This scoping study explores the programmes and initiatives of local faith actors (which can include formal and informal religious leaders, worship communities, faith networks, and local and national faith-based organisations) in their response to modern slavery and human trafficking in the Global South. It brings together evidence from a review of over 200 pieces of grey and academic literature and 14 interviews with practitioners. It is the most wide-ranging presentation, to date, of on-the-ground work of local faith actors (LFAs) responding to modern slavery and human trafficking in the Global South.

This report highlights many initiatives of LFAs, including those related to preventing modern slavery and human trafficking (often through education and awareness), as well as the wide array of services they provide related to protecting and caring for survivors. The report also explores the ways in which LFAs support prosecution processes, and how some engage in policy-related work with governmental agencies and policy stakeholders.

Click here to read the full report.

See here for more on the Anti-Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Learning Hub

Faith Actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children

June 2019

This literature review is one part of three of the JLI Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC) Hub scoping study. It presents an overview of published and grey literature in regard to the unique contributions of faith actors to eliminating violence against children as well as how faith actors have been involved in perpetuation thereof.

This scoping study offers an initial contribution to exploring existing evidence in two specific areas:

  • Firstly, the unique contributions of faith communities both in relation to ending, as well as contributing to, violence against children, to understand their involvement in this sphere.
  • Secondly, the role of faith actors in influencing wider child protection systems to prevent and respond to EVAC to understand the potential for their engagement

 

Suggested citation: Rutledge, K. and Eyber, C. (2019) ‘Scoping Study on Faith actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children.’ Washington DC: Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities Ending Violence Against Children Hub.

 

View the other JLI EVAC Scoping Reports

Faith Actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children

June 2019

This report presents findings from the consultation component – one part of three of the JLI Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC) Hub scoping study. The study examines existing evidence, analyses trends, identifies key gaps and highlights examples of faith actors working to end violence against children. This data is crucial to help policymakers, religious leaders and practitioners inform policies and advocate for programmes and prevention efforts with faith communities to end violence against children. It will help set a future research agenda for the EVAC Hub and support evidence-based work with faith communities to end violence against children.

This scoping study offers an initial contribution to exploring existing evidence in two specific areas:

  • Firstly, the unique contributions of faith communities both in relation to ending, as well as contributing to, violence against children, to understand their involvement in this sphere.
  • Secondly, the role of faith actors in influencing wider child protection systems to prevent and respond to EVAC to understand the potential for their engagement

Three cross-cutting issues were identified by Hub leaders and were built into the study: child participation, gender and interfaith engagement. This report is based on evidence that all religions contain protective aspects, which offer important contributions to the EVAC task. Religious actors such as leaders, scholars, educators and faith-based organisations can play critical roles in behaviour change, service delivery, referrals and advocacy, by offering a unique entry point.

 

Suggested Citation: Palm, S. (2019) ‘Scoping Study on Faith actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children.’ Expert Consultation Report. Washington DC: Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities Ending Violence Against Children Hub.

View the other JLI EVAC Scoping Reports

Faith Actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children

June 2019

This report presents findings from the case study submission process – one part of three of the JLI Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC) Hub scoping study. They offer evidence to support the claim that religions offer an important contribution to EVAC. The six case studies are from diverse regions and faiths includes a short concluding summary.

Case study 1 – Peace, Love, and Tolerance: Basic Messages from Islam and Christianity to Protect Children from Violence and Harmful Practices, Egypt

Case Study 2 – Learning to Live Together, El Salvador

Case Study 3 – Empowering Children as Peacebuilders, Central African Republic

Case Study 4 – Integrated Approach to Gender-Based Violence and Child Protection, Mali, Niger and Pakistan

Case Study 5 – The Butterfly Project: Listening to victims, Cambodia

Case Study 6 – Claves Christian Organisation, Uruguay

 

Suggested citation: Palm, S. and Colombo, F. (eds.) (2019). ‘Scoping Study on Faith actors’ involvement in the prevention, elimination and perpetuation of violence against children. Case Studies.’ Washington DC: Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities: JLI Ending Violence Against Children Hub

View the other JLI EVAC Scoping Reports

JLI Scoping Study On Local Faith Communities In Urban Displacement:

Evidence on Localisation and Urbanisation

Refugees & Forced Migration Learning Hub

By Olivia Wilkinson & Joey Ager

The aim of this report is to highlight evidence regarding the roles and impact that Local Faith Communities (LFCs) play in relation to urban refugees, with the aim of informing interconnected conversations around localisation and urbanisation.

The international community is increasingly committed to supporting local responses to displacement, at a time when the humanitarian system is overburdened, underfunded and in flux as the world reportedly faces the highest levels of displacement ever recorded – over 65 million people in 2017, who have been forced to flee their homes due to conflict, violence, and persecution. In 2016 the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) resulted in the Charter for Change and a renewed call for meaningful support for the ‘localisation of humanitarian aid’ agenda. In part building on the UNHCR’s work following the High Commissioner’s Dialogue on Faith and Protection in December 2012, this includes recognition of the actual and potential roles of LFCs in offering protection, solidarity and assistance to displaced people throughout different stages and spaces of their journeys.

This evidence is therefore centrally relevant to two key debates in contemporary humanitarian policy and practice – localisation and urbanisation – whose outcomes will have a signifcant impact on the future of refugee protection.

 

Catch up on the discussion on the JLI Refugee Hub Scoping Study with study researchers and JLI Refugee Hub Co-chairs. Click here to watch the webinar

“Faith-based Interventions in Peace, Conflict and Violence: A Scoping Study” was launched at the World Humanitarian Summit on May 23, 2016 at the JLIF&LC & Soka Gakkai International Side Event “Evidence on Religious Groups’ Contributions to Humanitarian Response”. For more information about the launch, please visit: www.jliflc.com/whs

An Evidence Brief for the WHS, based on the Scoping Study and linked to WHS Core Commitment 1 “Global leadership to prevent and end conflict”, is available here.

“Faith-based Interventions in Peace, Conflict and Violence: A Scoping Study” was authored by Chris Shannahan and Laura Payne of Coventry University, in close collaboration with the JLI Peace & Conflict Hub Members and Co-Chairs: Sarah Pickwick (World Vision), Alpaslan Ozerdem (Coventry University) and Lucy Salek (Islamic Relief).

For other resources on faith, peace and conflict see here

“A scoping study on the role of faith communities and organisations in prevention and response to sexual and gender-based violence:  Implications for policy and practice” was completed by Elisabet Le Roux, Stellenbosch University, on behalf of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith & Local Communities Gender-based Violence Hub. DFID provided funding for the report.

The associated Policy Brief is located here

 

Immunization has often been viewed as the leading light of public health intervention, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) notes that the two public health interventions that have had the greatest impact on the world’s child health are clean water and vaccines. If immunization is one of the leading stars of public health, then religion is the one of the frustrating complexities. However, the literature and evidence on religion and immunization is highly limited, with little coherence and major evidence gaps.

We report on a broad scoping review here which set out to map and understand the available literature on ‘religion and immunization’ – in search of relevant information on how immunization impacts with religion (or ‘faith’), religious institutions and communities. The basic intention is to make note of where evidence and information can be found, and what key areas for further research, engagement and partnership can be drawn from the existing literature.

This review forms part of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) which aims to develop and communicate robust, practical evidence on the under‐documented role of local faith communities (LFCs) for community systems strengthening. JLI brings together practitioners, academics, faith leaders, local community members and other stakeholders in a joint‐learning approach organized around ‘learning hubs’, each of which has a particular exploratory focus.

This review draws together diverse materials (after assessment for quality and relevance) – and has a particular focus on LMIC settings, although given the paucity of materials, and the way issues relating to immunization cross over migrant communities, this is not a clear division (that is, information from higher income settings is included where considered highly relevant).

 

See here for annotated bibliography

Read about the JLI Immunization Hub